Week 7 Activities

By Thursday 7/21:

  • Produce your first DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your first Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog post

By Friday 7/22:

  • Blog about your DS106 Assignment Bank creation. For Week 6 and Week 7 you will be pursuing your own storytelling interests, and are welcome to select any assignment from any category.
    • Your assignment should explore your chosen storytelling theme
    • Follow these DS106 blogging guidelines, and promote your blog via Twitter (#ds106 and #ILT5340)
  • Read either McIntosh (1989) or Nilsson (2010); you’re also welcome to read both.
  • Add your Hypothesis web annotations to this week’s course readings (both required and recommended)
    • We’ll be annotating – as we did during Week 1 – as one large group using “Summer 16 ILT5340” (and not a, b, c, and d)
    • You’re encouraged to engage with recommended readings via public (not private group) Hypothesis annotations
  • Blog your response to our course readings and your interest-driven scholarship (for grad students only)
    • Your interest-driven scholarship should explore your chosen storytelling theme
    • Follow our Criteria for Reading Responses (in Canvas)
  • Blog your Week 7 story critique
    • Your story critique should explore and critique a story related to your chosen theme
    • Follow our Criteria for Critiques of Digital Stories (in Canvas)

By Sunday 7/24:

  • Produce your second DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your second Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog post
  • Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ story critiques
    • Annotate blog posts from any peer in our course (and not a, b, c, and d)
    • Post your response annotations to our large group using the “Summer 16 ILT5340” private group
  • Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ reading responses
    • Annotate blog posts from any peer in our course (and not a, b, c, and d)
    • Post your response annotations to our large group using the “Summer 16 ILT5340” private group
  • Write your Week 7 reflective summary
    • Follow our Criteria for Weekly Reflections (in Canvas)
    • You are welcome to either blog this reflective summary or to send privately to Lisa and Remi via email

Finding Voice in Digital Stories

Happy Sunday Digital Storytellers!

It’s been an eventful past few months around the world. There are always world happenings, but you can’t deny that recently there has been a lot happening in the world. From international affairs such as the Turkish military coup to the most recent terror attack in France. There’s also a lot happening at home with the Orlando shooting and the impending presidential election. We’ve also had some happy stories in the news recently, Pokemon Go has had a great reception and is bringing people together like never before, and the NASA Juno spacecraft made it to Jupiter and is sending back stunning images.

There’s no doubt that with our constant digital connectivity we are surrounded by digital stories. It’s easy to get caught up in the fuss of it all, and get overwhelmed with everything that’s being thrown at us. But what’s important is listening for the voice in these digital stories. There are a lot of fluff pieces, or stories that are masked as advertisements, but the really good digital stories are the ones with a voice. You know it when you see it. It evokes emotion, any kind of emotion. Some stories will make you happy, sad, joyful, and maybe even angry. They suck you in and don’t let got. These digital stories are the ones with voice, and sometimes really loud voices.

This week we had one of these digital stories shared with our class. Remi shared a personal story about his recent experience with the COLTT conference organizers. His story is a good story, he uses his voice and evokes emotion. I felt upset after reading his story, not because Remi is a colleague, but because he uses his voice to tell a compelling story. I wasn’t upset at Remi, I was upset at the COLTT organizers. I’ve presented at several conferences similar to to the COLTT conference and I can’t imagine anyone accusing my credibility like they did with Remi. I’m also happy that Remi shared his voice on the topic, when most would keep silent and comply.

All this to say, when you are critiquing your digital stories this week try and find the voice in them. You’ll know when you find it. Also, when creating your ds106 stories this week try and insert your voice. Your focal themes all have a special meaning, and I challenge you to let your expertise in the subject, or opinion on the matters flow through your creations. Make them individual, make them your own!

 
I’m looking forward to seeing what everyone creates for their final ds106 digital stories this week!

Week 6 Activities

Here are activities for the sixth week of our course together.

By Thursday 7/14:

  • Produce your first DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your first Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog post

By Friday 7/15:

  • Blog about your DS106 Assignment Bank creation. For Week 6 and Week 7 you will be pursuing your own storytelling interests, and are welcome to select any assignment from any category.
    • Your assignment should explore your chosen storytelling theme
    • Follow these DS106 blogging guidelines, and promote your blog via Twitter (#ds106 and #ILT5340)
  • Read Lankshear and Knobel (2011) Ch7: Social Learning, “Push” and “Pull,” and Building Platforms for Collaborative Learning
  • Add your Hypothesis web annotations to this week’s course readings (both required and recommended)
    • You’ll be annotating our required reading in your small group (a, b, c, d)
    • You’re encouraged to engage with recommended readings via public (not private group) Hypothesis annotations
  • Blog your response to our course readings and your interest-driven scholarship (for grad students only)
    • Your interest-driven scholarship should explore your chosen storytelling theme
    • Follow our Criteria for Reading Responses (noted in Canvas)
  • Blog your Week 6 story critique
    • Your story critique should explore and critique a story related to your chosen theme
    • Follow our Criteria for Critiques of Digital Stories (noted in Canvas)

By Sunday 7/17:

  • Produce your second DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your second Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog post
  • Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ story critiques
    • Annotate blog posts from peers in your small group (a, b, c, d)
    • Post your response annotations to your private group
  • Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ reading responses
    • Annotate blog posts from peers in your small group (a, b, c, d)
    • Post your response annotations to your private group
  • Write your Week 6 reflective summary
    • Follow our Criteria for Weekly Reflections (noted in Canvas)
    • You are welcome to either blog this reflective summary or to send privately to Lisa and Remi via email

Week 4 Activities

By Thursday 6/30:

  • Produce your first DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your first Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog post

By Friday 7/1:

  • Blog about your DS106 Assignment Bank Design creation
    • Your design assignment should explore your chosen storytelling theme
    • Follow these DS106 blogging guidelines, and promote your blog via Twitter (#ds106 and #ILT5340)
  • Read Davies & Merchant (2007) Chapter 8: Looking from the inside out: Academic blogging as new literacy
  • Add your Hypothesis web annotations to this week’s course readings (both required and recommended)
    • You’ll be annotating our required reading in your small group (a, b, c, d)
    • You’re encouraged to engage with recommended readings via public (not private group) Hypothesis annotations
  • Blog your response to our course readings and your interest-driven scholarship (for grad students only)
  • Blog your Week 4 story critique

By Sunday 7/3:

  • Produce your second DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your second Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog post
  • Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ story critiques
    • Annotate blog posts from peers in your small group (a, b, c, d)
    • Post your response annotations to your private group
  • Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ reading responses
    • Annotate blog posts from peers in your small group (a, b, c, d)
    • Post your response annotations to your private group
  • Write your Week 4 reflective summary

Another Fantastic Week!

Good Day Storytellers!

Looks like everyone is falling into a groove. I’ve noticed that your assignments and daily creates seem to be coming easier for you and you’re cranking them out like pros!

We had a little snag with hypothesis this week. It seems as though the groups feature malfunctioned but the good people at hypothesis fixed the issue in no time at all. Just a reminder that if you are still having trouble using the program that you might need to update your Chrome extension.

I’m happy to see some of you starting to experiment with your learning. I had a question this week regarding using hypothesis on an iPad. Since I don’t own any Apple devices myself, I tapped into the knowledge of my classmate from the spring who managed to get it working on his iPad.

This week you jumped into the world of video production. I love producing video, it’s probably the part of my job that I enjoy the most. Like many of you, I often run into issues and get frustrated. The finished product is so worth it, when I complete a challenging video I get a huge sense of accomplishment and pride. I’m also waist deep in video myself this week. My assignment for the class that I’m taking is a video assignment, and I’m working on two videos at work, so I feel you! Over the next few days I’ll be watching your assignments and commenting via hypothesis. I’m really looking forward to it!

Next week you’ll be doing a Design assignment from ds106. Some programs that you might find useful when completing your design projects:

  • Gimp – Free image manipulation / editing tool
  • Pixabay – Royalty free / copyright free images
  • Creative Commons – Royalty free / copyright free images (attribution sometimes required)
  • PowerPoint – You wouldn’t believe how much design work you can do with this program (You have access to this through office 365 with CU Denver).

We’ll also be stepping away from Lankshear and Knobel this coming week. I have not read this particular article by Davies and Merchant, and I’m excited to read it and annotate it along with you!

That’s it! If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact me.

 

Ending Week 2

Hi Digital Storytellers!

This week I decided to read and listen to everyone’s audio assignments. Overall, everyone did a fantastic job! Some great stories were shared, and I commented on everyone’s assignments using hypothesis (If I missed anyone, let me know!).

I saw that a lot of you struggled with this week’s audio assignment, specifically the technical aspects. Audio is a difficult medium to work with, I also struggled last year with this assignment. My produced audio assignment is probably my least favorite of all my ds106 assignments completed last year. All this to say that you’re not alone, I understand your struggle! I still struggle with audio projects.

Marge

 

Moving into week three you will be doing a video assignment. Video can also be very frustrating. You have access to some free tools to help you with your projects. On Windows you have Movie Maker (should be installed already, if not you can download from the link), and on Apple you have iMovie. On top of that YouTube has some editing features available after you upload your video. Other tools you can look into using include Camtasia (30 day free trial, then around $200 after if you decide to purchase), Adobe Premiere (very expensive, but great if you already have it) and Screencast-o-matic (if your chosen assignment requires a screencast).

This week you got the chance to read my favorite chapter from Lankshear and Knobel. Here is my reading response from last year about it. Notice that Remi and I disagree on one particular subject (the conversation is in my reflection for that week), and we still don’t agree to this day, and that’s ok. As graduate students, we’re allowed to disagree with our professors or readings, as long as we do it in a respectful way.

I also wanted to offer to anyone in the course that might be struggling the opportunity have a phone call with me via Google Hangouts. If you’re interested, please send me an email and we can set something up. Keep in mind that I’m in the Eastern time zone.
Keep telling those stories! Until next time!

Week 2 Activities

A Few General Reminders:

  • Please update any changed info to the “Our Info” doc (link available via Canvas)
  • Please confirm registration of your blog with DS106 via this link (though please don’t register twice!)

By Thursday 6/16:

1. Produce your first DS106 Daily Create

  • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
  • Use Hypothesis and add your first Daily Create as a public annotation to our Week 2 blog post (and to the dedicated Week 2 URL, not our blog’s home page)
  • You’re encouraged to create a multimodal annotation, so review how to add images, videos, and audio via Hypothesis

By Friday 6/17:

1. Blog about your DS106 Assignment Bank Audio creation

  • Your Audio assignment should, if possible, explore your chosen storytelling theme
  • Follow these DS106 blogging guidelines, and promote your blog via Twitter (#ds106 and #ILT5340)

2. Read Lankshear & Knobel (2011) Chapter 4: New Literacies and Social Learning Practices of Digital Remixing

3. Add your Hypothesis web annotations to this week’s course readings (both required and recommended)

  • Starting this week – and for the remainder of the term – you’ll be annotating in a smaller group (approx. eight learners)
  • Join your smaller annotation group (via the Our Groups doc available in Canvas)

4. Blog your response to our course readings and your interest-driven scholarship (for grad students only)

  • Your interest-driven scholarship should, if possible, explore your chosen theme
  • Follow our Criteria for Reading Responses (in Canvas)

5. Blog your Week 1 story critique

  • Your story critique should, if possible, explore and critique a story about your theme
  • Follow our Criteria for Critiques of Digital Stories (in Canvas)

By Sunday 6/19:

1. Produce your second DS106 Daily Create

  • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
  • Use Hypothesis and add your second Daily Create as a public annotation to our Week 2 blog post

2. Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ story critiques

  • Starting this week – and for the remainder of the term – you’ll be annotating critiques of peers in your smaller group
  • Post your response annotations to your private group (see Our Groups via Canvas)

3. Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ reading responses

  • Starting this week – and for the remainder of the term – you’ll be annotating reading responses of peers in your smaller group
  • Post your response annotations to your private group (see Our Groups via Canvas)

4. Write your Week 2 reflective summary

  • Follow our Criteria for Weekly Reflections (in Canvas)
  • You are welcome to either blog this reflective summary or to send privately to Lisa and Remi via email

Week 1 Activities

The following summarizes activities for the first week of INTE 4340/5340 Learning with Digital Stories (Monday, June 6th through Sunday, June 12th). As noted, some activities and links to resources are intentionally private and are only accessible to course participants via our Canvas LMS.

ASAP:

  • Start reading this blog (such as Lisa’s amazing introductory post!)
  • Join Twitter
  • Join Hypothesis
  • Set up a WordPress blog
  • Add your info to “Our Info” (accessibly only via Canvas)
  • Register your (new) WordPress blog with DS106 via this link (and make sure to affiliate with our course!)

By Thursday 6/9:

  1. Produce your first DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your first Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog page. In other words, annotate this text right here with your creative media! (Also, this may require that you host your created media via Flickr, YouTube, or a similar platform.)

By Friday 6/10:

  1. Blog about your DS106 Assignment Bank Visual creation
  2. Read Lankshear & Knobel (2007) Chapter 1: Sampling “the New” in New Literacies (accessible from our Course Readings)
  3. Add your Hypothesis web annotations to this week’s course readings (both required and those recommended readings based upon your interest)
    • This week we’ll be annotating as one large group using the private “Summer 16 ILT5340” group.
    • Your invitation to this private annotation group is linked via Canvas.
  4. Blog your response to our course readings and your interest-driven scholarship (for grad students only)
    • Interest-driven means based upon your personal interest – go find some awesome scholarship to read and write about!
    • Follow the reading response blogging criteria posted in Canvas
    • Promote your blog publicly via Twitter (#ds106 and #ILT5340)
  5. Blog your Week 1 story critique
    • Follow the critiques of digital stories criteria posted in Canvas
    • Promote your blog publicly via Twitter (#ds106 and #ILT5340)

By Sunday 6/12:

  1. Produce your second DS106 Daily Create
    • Tweet your Daily Create to #ds106 and #ILT5340
    • Use Hypothesis and add your second Daily Create as a public annotation to this blog page. In other words, annotate this text right here with your creative media!
  2. Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ story critiques (their blog posts)
    • This week you can choose any 2 peer blog posts to annotate
    • Post your annotations to the private “Summer 16 ILT5340” group
  3. Use Hypothesis to annotate 2 of your colleagues’ reading responses (their blog posts)
    • This week you can choose any 2 peer blog posts to annotate
    • Post your annotations to the private “Summer 16 ILT5340” group
  4. Write your Week 1 reflective summary
    • Follow our criteria for weekly reflections posted in Canvas
    • You are welcome to either publicly blog this reflective summary or to send it privately to Lisa and Remi via email
  5. Propose your storytelling focal theme by completing our proposal form (accessible privately via Canvas)

Digital Storytelling Students: Start your Engines!

Get your seat belts buckled and queue up some awesome music because we’re going on an interesting ride this summer. Welcome to INTE 5340 – Digital Storytelling! My name is Lisa Dise and I am your TA for this course (read more about me on my website). I’ve traveled down this road before, experienced some bumps and potholes first hand and held tightly onto the steering wheel, bracing myself the whole time. This time I’m here to serve as a guide for this course; I’m sitting in the backseat, looking at the beautiful scenery as you drive, with a map in hand, ready in-case you need help with directions.

Image of windy road
This is what it felt like last year at times!

Hopefully you have all read the syllabus by now (maybe even a couple of times!). As you can probably tell, this class is intense. Will this course be challenging? Yes. Will it be rewarding? Most definitely. Will you learn something? Absolutely. Will you have fun in the process? I hope so! This class is HARD, I’m not going to hide it. It was the first class I took as a graduate student, and I learned a lot, about digital storytelling, and about myself as a student. One thing it forced me to do, was to learn how to manage my time. What worked for me was to create a schedule of what days I aimed to have course tasks accomplished. Here’s an example of my weekly schedule from last summer:

*Note that the course I took last summer had a slightly different form than the one you’re taking now.

Monday – Read course announcements, First Daily Create, Finish reading if necessary, Pick DS106 Assignment Bank

Tuesday – DS106 Assignment Bank

Wednesday – Digital Story Critiques

Thursday – Reading Response

Friday – Flex day

Saturday – Respond to Peers, Second Daily Create

Sunday – Weekly Reflection, Read for next week

Lather, Rise, Repeat. I tried to stick to this schedule as best I could. There were times where I needed to be flexible and moved some of the assignments around. The key to success in this course is to be organized!

 

Now, a few notes regarding course specifics…


Learning with Remi

I’ve learned with Remi twice now. Remi expects a lot from his students, but in return you will get a present, engaging and caring professor. Here’s a few tips I can share about learning with Remi:

  • Watch every screencast and read every announcement: Remi won’t share anything superficial or unimportant.
  • Ask questions if you have them: Remi wants to see you succeed, not fail.
  • Be honest. Did you struggle this week? It’s ok. Challenges are expected and experimentation is encouraged. Keep trying until you get it!

Theme

Choose something you like, something you’re passionate about, something that’s important to you. You’ll be working with this theme all summer, the last thing you want is to get bored with it! My theme from last year was “Becoming a new mother”, I enjoyed creating media around my experiences as a new mother, and my son. Remember, at least four of your ds106 assignments must be related to your theme.

ds106?

ds106 is an open digital storytelling course offered by the University of Mary Washington. We will be interacting with the ds106 community A LOT. I suggest taking some time to get acquainted to the site, and watch some videos on YouTube about other’s experiences. Also, get creative! Find an assignment you want to complete, or really like today’s daily create but want to change it up a bit? Go for it! One more tip about ds106, read the how to blog like a champ rubric and use it when writing your blog post submissions.

About those blogs…

You will be blogging, multiple times a week. The first thing you need to do for this course (after you’ve read the syllabus) is set up a blog if you don’t have one already. If you’re an ILT student, then use your base camp blog. If you need to set up a blog I recommend WordPress or Blogspot, they’re free and easy to use.

You will also be reading and comment on your peers blogs, because of the amount of people in this class I recommend using a service like feedly to help keep everything organized.

Twitter

Twitter is a fantastic tool to help you connect and network with your peers and others in the digital storytelling community. You will be required to promote your blog posts through Twitter. Get used to using the hashtag #ILT5340 for all your coursework, and #ds106 for any ds106 related assignments. On top of following everyone in the course, you should consider following these Twitter accounts: @ds106 – The official ds106 Twitter handle, @ds106dc – The ds106 daily create account, @jimgroom – Creator and professor of ds106, and @cogdog – Creator and professor of ds106.

Once you become active on Twitter you will notice that the actual Twitter website won’t be able to track everything as well as you want it to. I like to use TweetDeck (Chrome app) to keep myself organized. There are many tutorials available to teach you how to use TweetDeck effectively.

Speaking of Chrome apps… Hypothesis!

We will be conducting the majority of our class discussions through an app called Hypothesis. Get yourself set up with an account on the hypothesis website. Once you have created your account, download and install the Chrome extension. This application is only available through Google Chrome, please install the browser on your computer if you don’t already have it. Once you have your hypothesis account and extension already set up, please join our course group by clicking on this link. That’s it! You’re ready to start annotating and discussing. Watch the video below to get an idea on how to get started.

You can find multiple resources for using hypothesis as a student here.

Note that starting in week two you will be annotating and discussing in your groups. More information on that will be coming shortly.

 

Congratulations! You’ve now completed your initial Digital Storytelling driver training. You’re now ready to take the wheel. Watch out for those speed bumps and remember to holler if you have any questions!